Saving Elk

Wells Fargo has a history of conserving resources through smart business practices, such as recycling waste paper, equipping buildings with solar power, and buying more renewable energy than any other company.

Wells Fargo Express also has had a role in conserving wildlife.

Wells Farfo ships elk (Click for larger image in a new window)By the early 1900′s, many species native to North America were on the verge of extinction Click here to learn about third-party website links, including the American bald eagle, the buffalo, and elk. The historic range of the buffalo Click here to learn about third-party website links once ranged from Canada to Mexico, and across the United States into Florida. Bison have since bounced back, and now their numbers have increased to the extent that grocery stores are even selling buffalo meatClick here to learn about third-party website links

One species of elk — another animal that faced extinction because people hunted them for their hide, antlers, and ivory teeth — was not so lucky. The federal government pronounced the Eastern Elk Click here to learn about third-party website links extinct in 1880.

The historic range of elk Click here to learn about third-party website links included Oregon, and during the early twentieth century the Oregon State Fish and Game Commission Click here to learn about third-party website links developed a plan to restore the elk population.

In 1913, the Commission brought 15 elk from Jackson Hole, Wyoming Click here to learn about third-party website links to Wallowa County, OregonClick here to learn about third-party website links As the herd increased in size, Wells Fargo shipped elk to other parts of Oregon. After trapping the young elk, the game warden placed the elk on crates built on sleds and transported them 45 miles to Enterprise, OregonClick here to learn about third-party website links From Enterprise, Wells Fargo shipped the elk to Ashland, Oregon. Wells Fargo’s Chief Messenger C. T. Allan and Route Agent C. E. Redman accompanied the elk. Once the elk arrived in Klamath Falls, the game warden released the elk into the wild 18 miles from ChiloquinClick here to learn about third-party website links

Wells Fargo Messenger, May 1917 (Click for larger image in a new window)Today, elk thrive in Oregon — the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Click here to learn about third-party website links estimates that Oregon has over 100,000. This video Click here to learn about third-party website links from National Geographic captures the haunting sound of bugling elks in the wild.

A few years ago, I drove past a herd of elk on the south side of I-84, near Cascade LocksClick here to learn about third-party website links It’s great to know that herd could be descended from the elk Wells Fargo shipped from Jackson Hole.

This entry was posted in Miscellaneous and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Saving Elk

  1. Bev Smith says:

    Thanks for the information about elk in Eastern Oregon. My extended family has a ranch outside of Enterprise and we see elk all the time. Good to know WF helped that happen!

Guided By History

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Your questions and comments really matter to us! We're glad you want to join the conversation and connect with other readers. All we ask is that you keep some simple guidelines in mind:

  • Stay on-topic. Only comments that are related to the subject of the blog entry will be posted.
  • Be respectful. It's okay if you disagree with a post or comment, but please, no personal attacks or offensive language.
  • Maintain your privacy and confidentiality.Please do not provide any of your specific account details or other personal information! If you have immediate service needs, please contact your bank representative or Customer Service.
  • Wells Fargo team members: In the interest of full disclosure, if you are a current employee of or are associated with Wells Fargo, please make note of your affiliation.