The bucket is half full

I found an interesting statistic from a study out of Virginia Tech that noted that 80% of Americans don’t have goals. Wow – I have goals but I do not have a bucket list, intentionally. What is the difference? I am a maniacal list-writer and unashamed Franklin Covey gal, and I write a list of goals at the start of each year, reviewing those regularly. So, why no bucket list?

I rush through my every day with more than 12 meetings on a typical work day and weekends filled with activity. So, every day I am certain that I miss out on a nuance as I speed by – a moment I should have captured, that person I should have called, an idea I did not give time to bloom. Knowing this, I actively try to not spend time considering what I am or may miss out on – life is not about what I need to do before I die, but what I need to do to live.

I recall one business dinner where someone started that question around the table of “what do you need to do before you die…” and the answers ranged from learning a new language to jumping out of an airplane. I have so completely confused all non-English languages I have learned that no RosettaStone, unless it is magical, can help me now. And, I have flown so much that the concept of stepping out of a perfectly functioning plane is not for me.

If you are wondering how I answered the question at the table, I said, “I have one relationship I need to mend, other than that I am good to go.” It may sound simple, but each day I try to focus on the top things that will most make a difference to my family, with my friends and in my work/community. Often it involves working very long hours, other times it is enjoying that perfect family vacation, or driving new changes in my workplace or community one day and one step at a time.

Do you believe bucket lists are positive or a negative way to set goals?

This entry was posted in General, Retirement planning and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The bucket is half full

  1. Cheryl Carnivale says:

    I am a big traveller but with limited time and money to use until I retire. So I take one large trip a year. At age 58, I figure I have about 20 years or so of these big trips I can take, health permitting. I hope to take more than one big trip in retirement years if funds available and am thinking retirement at 66 yrs 2 months per Social Security age. A bucket list helps me decide what trips I hope to take in that time frame and in what order of desire so I can budget and save the necessary funds. To me, it is a positive.

  2. Mary Lou Dixon says:

    I try and just live each day like a bucket list, seeing and making the best out of the joy of everything that I do or come in contact with. So my bucket list is just savoring the moment. I don’t feel I need a list of things to do before I die because each thing I am doing matters.

  3. Cathleen Fourman says:

    I totally agree with Cheryl. People always say “someday” I’m going to travel, learn a language, etc. Folks this IS someday! If you really want to do something big before you die, you need to have that bucket list as an incentive, and you need to pull the trigger.

Beyond Today Blog

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Your questions and comments really matter to us! We're glad you want to join the conversation and connect with other readers. All we ask is that you keep some simple guidelines in mind:

  • Stay on-topic. Only comments that are related to the subject of the blog entry will be posted.
  • Be respectful. It's okay if you disagree with a post or comment, but please, no personal attacks or offensive language.
  • Maintain your privacy and confidentiality.Please do not provide any of your specific account details or other personal information! If you have immediate service needs, please contact your bank representative or Customer Service.
  • Wells Fargo team members: In the interest of full disclosure, if you are a current employee of or are associated with Wells Fargo, please make note of your affiliation.