Wells Fargo Messenger

The Wells Fargo Messenger is a familiar sight to many. Not only do we see examples of this monthly company magazine in the history museums, but their diverse cover art is seen all over many Wells Fargo office buildings, as well as in many advertisements.

The wide variety of artwork, depicting everything from famous 18th century modes of travel Click here to learn about third-party website links to holiday themes, makes the Messenger covers an ideal way for Wells Fargo to utilize it’s rich past in contemporary marketing.

Burns D. CaldwellDue to its high visibility, the Wells Fargo Messenger is a popular topic of conversation for museum visitors.

They have many questions: What was the Messenger? When was it printed? Was it a monthly publication?

So I thought I would blog about it in several parts (there is a lot to research!) in an attempt to shed light about what happened between the covers of the Wells Fargo Messenger.

This “house organ” Click here to learn about third-party website links began publication in September 1912, running through June 1918. Its inception was overseen by the Company’s president, Burns D. Caldwell. In an announcement about the Messenger, he stated that:

In establishing a magazine or house organ the company is following the plan adopted by many large railroad and other public service institutions.

The extensive scope of the company, both in number of employees and wide extent of territory, should make such a medium of communication especially valuable. The primary object, of course, is to bring its representatives into a closer relation and to afford a better knowledge of its policies and of the conditions under which the varied phases of its work are to be performed, as well as to secure unity of aim and effort in serving its patrons.

The Wells Fargo Messenger will contain much that will be interesting, entertaining and instructive, but its principal function will be that of raising the company’s standard of efficiency and usefulness by the promotion of higher ideals of individual attainment and of mutual accomplishment.

Edward HungerfordAnyone who was an employee of Wells Fargo was invited and encouraged to contribute to the Messenger “almost anything that is of interest to you in your work is of interest to this magazine.” This included works of fiction, involving Wells Fargo and its employees. The first story in the premier edition of the Wells Fargo Messenger was entitled “The Man Who Fought Tigers” by Wells Fargo Advertising Manager, Edward Hungerford Click here to learn about third-party website links. A great story with suspense, romance Click here to learn about third-party website links and of course, a dutiful station agent who risks life and limb (I won’t give away the endingClick here to learn about third-party website links.

The Messenger, however, had one very strict guideline for submissions, whether they were contributions or criticisms. That, though, is the subject for another blog….

This entry was posted in Miscellaneous, Museums, Remember. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Wells Fargo Messenger

  1. blog reader #1 says:

    “The Messenger, however, had one very strict guideline for submissions, whether they were contributions or criticisms. That, though, is the subject for another blog….”

    Don’t leave us hanging!

Guided By History

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Your questions and comments really matter to us! We're glad you want to join the conversation and connect with other readers. All we ask is that you keep some simple guidelines in mind:

  • Stay on-topic. Only comments that are related to the subject of the blog entry will be posted.
  • Be respectful. It's okay if you disagree with a post or comment, but please, no personal attacks or offensive language.
  • Maintain your privacy and confidentiality.Please do not provide any of your specific account details or other personal information! If you have immediate service needs, please contact your bank representative or Customer Service.
  • Wells Fargo team members: In the interest of full disclosure, if you are a current employee of or are associated with Wells Fargo, please make note of your affiliation.