Those Madison Avenue Men and Women

The cable series Mad Men was nominated this year for eight Emmy awards in acting, art direction, costumes, make up, hair styling, and more. Like so many people, I have been an avid viewer and am sorry to see it coming to an end. As an archivist, I salute the creators who have so thoroughly researched the style and content of the era to portray details with heightened accuracy, even flawlessly incorporating real corporations, people and events into the fictional storylines.

Sadly, the Wells Fargo Corporate Archives wasn’t one of the many repositories called upon to help with research, but the ongoing storyline about McCann-Erickson has me intrigued. The real McCann-Erickson was Wells Fargo’s advertising agency in the 1960s after our merger with American Trust Company. Was it really as dramatic behind the scenes as experienced by Don, Peggy and the gang? I look forward to the series’ final episodes.

These print ads from the early 1960s have great style and elegantly illustrate customers in conversation about relationships they enjoy with their bankers. While products are mentioned, the focus is entirely on connections with customers and the communities in which we work and live—something equally important today.

1961 Wells Fargo American Trust Company print advertisement (Wells Fargo Corporate Archives)

1961 Wells Fargo American Trust Company print advertisement (Wells Fargo Corporate Archives)

1961 Wells Fargo American Trust Company print advertisement (Wells Fargo Corporate Archives)

1961 Wells Fargo American Trust Company print advertisement (Wells Fargo Corporate Archives)

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Guided By History

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